Bullies Of The Garden: Five Extremely Space-Hungry Plants You Don’t Need In Your Garden

As gardeners, all most of us want for our gardens is to flourish like the Garden of Eden and look good even when we are feeling low. This leads us to make many mistakes that may, in the not too distant future, ruin our beloved garden completely. One of those mistakes is, planting the wrong plants. Plants that are perfectly capable of not only invading your garden, but reducing it to nothing that you wanted it to be. Welcome to the top five bullies of the garden who have no business in your little haven.

1)   Mint

Mint

Mint

Herb gardens are a beautiful thing to have. And mint is obviously an inseparable part of it. I mean, why not? It smells good and it tastes even better.

But allow mint to grow freely, and it will probably be the only thing you’ll smell and see. This plant will always grow beyond its set boundaries. And once that begins, there’s really no stopping it.

Now, if you’re growing an herb garden in your window, this could mean huge trouble and a huger mess. I suggest you drop this out of your garden completely.

But, if you love mint a little too much, which is pretty understandable, you should leave it in a separate pot away from other plants. And if you’re planning to grow it on soil level, push a pot deep into the soil so it acts as a root barrier.

 

 

 

 

2)   Jasmine

Jasmine

Jasmine

Who can get over the sweet, heady fragrance of jasmine flowers? And who wouldn’t want these dainty, beautiful flowers in their lawns or windows? It’s too tempting a choice. But what needs to be remembered about jasmine is that it’s a vine.

And like all other vines, this one too has one very bad habit: taking over every available surface. Jasmine is officially invasive.

Unless you want the rest of your plants to be choked by these vines, you might want to keep them out.

 

 

3)   Bamboo

Bamboo

Bamboo

 

Bamboos are the epitome of all things sustainable, and low-maintenance. Add to that the incredible speed at which they grow, and they almost appear to be THE super-plant for those who want a garden but don’t want to put much effort into it

. The only blotch on this perfect horizon is its vigorous growth. So imagine this, unstoppable growth and an unstoppable speed. Killer, right?

There’s a solution, though. Dig an underground trench or root barriers to limit the growth only to a specific part of your landscaping.

Burpee Gardening>

 

 

4)   Fennel

Fennel

Fennel

 

What people feel for mint is the same they feel for fennel- an important part of the herb garden. After all, it is an important member of the kitchen ingredients too.

However, for those of you who didn’t know, fennel has gained quite a reputation for invading farm fields and taking over the original crops.

And trust me; it’ll do the same to your garden too.

Burpee Gardening>

 

 

5)   Periwinkle

Periwinkle

Periwinkle

 

These are so common a sight in most lawns, gardens and along sidewalks; it actually makes you wonder what business it has being on this list anyway. Periwinkles are as invasive as they are cute.

Most homeowners make the mistake of planting periwinkles because they’re evergreen and seem to flourish well in even the most barren and attention-deprived places.

All that is understandable, until one day all you can see in your lawn are periwinkles, periwinkles and more periwinkles. And since they root into the soil as they creep, they become all the more difficult to uproot and get rid of.

 

Gardener's Supply Company

Today’s guest author, John Walters, is a sales executive at the Water Garden Warehouse, a garden equipment store based in Australia. He works with utmost sincerity and strives to perform well at his job. He enjoys listening to soft music and taking long walks in his spare time.

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